Art

Art and Museums in NYC This Week

Our guide to new art shows — and some that will be closing soon.

‘CALDER: HYPERMOBILITY’ at the Whitney Museum of American Art (through Oct. 23). The Whitney has the world’s largest holdings of the American sculptor who invented the mobile, but this rejuvenating presentation of works in motion is a different sort of Calder show, and never the same twice. Before he hit upon his elegantly suspended plates of cut sheet metal, Calder first created kinetic sculptures with small, hidden motors. Motorized mobiles and ones activated only by air hang together in a single, beautiful gallery, and several times a day attendants come through to make the sculptures boogie. The Calder Foundation will also be updating this witty, wily retrospective with one-day presentations of more fragile kinetic works. (Jason Farago)
212-570-3600, whitney.org

‘REI KAWAKUBO/COMME DES GARÇONS: ART OF THE IN-BETWEEN’ at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (through Sept. 4). The latest Costume Institute extravaganza is a beautiful yet challenging plunge through nearly 40 years of innovation and increasingly unwearable garments from Rei Kawakubo, the great Japanese designer, and her Comme des Garçons label. A village of blazingly white structures encourages concentration. Look, look, look, it says, at the clothes, their fabrics, colors, shapes, shocks, quotations, details, exaggerations and parodies. Art, fashion or in between, Ms. Kawakubo’s creations bring us close to the unmistakable whir of artistic ambition. (Roberta Smith)
212-535-7710, metmuseum.org

‘IRVING PENN: CENTENNIAL’ at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (through July 30). In this crystalline exhibition, nearly every gallery exhales its own delicious breath, offering up concentrated views of Penn’s innovative still-life and fashion work for Vogue; his portraits of cultural luminaries and tradesmen, as well as of indigenous Peruvians; his nearly abstract close-ups of voluptuous nudes; and his colossal cigarette butts, with their tragicomic evocations of Roman columns, tombstones and even corpses. Also on display: his perfectionism, curious eye and innate classicizing style. (Smith)
212-535-7710, metmuseum.org

Last Chance

‘MARSDEN HARTLEY’S MAINE’ at the Met Breuer (closes on June 18). At the beginning of a peripatetic career, Marsden Hartley (1877-1943) made his home state, Maine, a major subject of his work. He focused on it again at the end of his life, always with conflicted feelings, evident in this fine, narratively paced, mood-swinging show. In paintings and drawings, this modernist Maine-iac found homoerotic fantasy, childhood memories and his own private version of Cézanne’s Mont Sainte-Victoire. (Holland Cotter)
212-731-1675, metmuseum.org

‘IGGY POP LIFE CLASS BY JEREMY DELLER’ at the Brooklyn Museum (closes on June 18). Last year, at 69, the rock star Iggy Pop was conscripted as the subject of a life drawing class organized by the British artist Jeremy Deller. Twenty-two art students were chosen for the class, which took place in February 2016 at the New York Academy of Art. In some 53 drawings at the museum, Iggy Pop looks like classical statuary, a cyborg or a ready-for-Pixar character. (Martha Schwendener)
718-638-5000, brooklynmuseum.org

‘A WORLD OF EMOTIONS: ANCIENT GREECE, 700 B.C.-200 A.D.’ at the Onassis Cultural Center (closes on June 24). We tend to think of the art of Classical Greece, with its buff Apollos and poised Aphrodites, as beyond perturbation. But this remarkable, free-admission show, made up largely of work from Greek museums, gives quite another view, of an art based on narratives driven by hatred, hubris

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